ANNIE’S HAPPY ENDING

Annie and litters of pups were allowed to suffer this way by the Maple Ridge SPCA until Animal Advocates was called

Much has changed at the SPCA since this article was written, some for the better and some for the worse. Read more: The BC SPCA Now.

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Annie wonders what we will do to her.
Annie wonders what we will do to her.

Just one of hundreds of calls begging for help that AAS gets every year. And every time the SPCA has been begged first, usually many times. Callers are always told the same thing (it never varies, we believe that all SPCA employees have been drilled in the only answers they are allowed to give), "Nothing we can do, as long as there is food water and shelter". That is not true. The provincial Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act allows the SPCA to determine what is neglect and for fifty years they have chosen to interpret it in that way, a way that absolves them of any real prevention of this kind of cruelty. See a lawyer's dissenting opinion on the way the SPCA enforces (doesn't enforce) the PCA Act. See how the BC SPCA stopped AAS from getting a definition of neglect included in the Act that would have made them actually prevent neglect.

We were told by the caller that the dog next door had been on a chain, unspayed, for several years and that she had just had another litter of pups, her third, and that previous litters had mostly ended up at the SPCA when no one would buy them. The Maple Ridge SPCA had been asked for help for Annie many times, with the usual result. No help. We found Annie and her pups like this, covered in flies, wet and dirty, Annie's chain too tangled for her to reach the dog house (which was full of dirt), so Annie had dug a depression in the mud for her pups. After begging and offering money, we were given Annie and her pups.

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The hole Annie dug for her pups because her tangled chain wouldn't reach her dirty dog house.
The hole Annie dug for her pups because her tangled chain wouldn't reach her dirty dog house.
Annie trying to keep her pups clean. The white spots are some of the hundred flies that constantly landed on her and the pups, in their eyes and on any body openings that they could lay eggs in.
Annie trying to keep her pups clean. The white spots are some of the hundred flies that constantly landed on her and the pups, in their eyes and on any body openings that they could lay eggs in.

With Annie and her pups hidden in the car, we drove straight to the Maple Ridge SPCA to "report" this glaring case of animal neglect ourselves. We did not identify ourselves of course - too often the SPCA will move to cover up their neglect of a suffering animal if they think AAS knows about it. The reaction? The usual. We were treated as though we were a meddling irritation. We were coldly told there was nothing the SPCA could do. On pressing, we were told that the SPCA might seize the pups (not Annie) when the pups were eight weeks old.

Why when they are eight weeks old? Because then they are weaned and do not need any special attention from the SPCA and are very "sellable". Too bad for Annie, but she is a nice source of sellable pups.

We pointed out that in eight weeks it would be mid-December and the pups would probably be dead from exposure. One had already died. Too bad. Nothing they were going to do.

We drove Annie and her pups home cuddled up in blankets in a nice, warm car and immediately took them all to our vet (standard AAS practice), and then to a foster home in North Vancouver. All Annie's pups got the best of homes and Annie herself really landed in clover in her new home where she is doted on and goes for long walkies in the park everyday.

Laurie Simington, AAS puppy trainer and foster mum, Lani Farnworth, Annie's pups and a tall bearded stranger.

Annie with Bear and Ted.

Annie with on the couch with Janice, Bear, and the cats.


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